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20121201
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. this bill allows us to have the resources we need to get more uninsured americans into the health-care system. it reduces costs and will make as a stronger nation. >> peter shumlin is joining us from vermont. thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks so much for having me. >> why did he decide to take this job? >> it is a fascinating question. they're going to start this cycle $30 million a behind were the republican governors association is. they have opportunities across the upper midwest and states like florida and on the west coast. the governor of arizona is not so convinced she% limited. she think she can run. sheikh -- she is a term limited. she thinks she can run. even some states in the south and along the atlantic coast. there are tons of opportunities for democrats. they are $30 million were the republicans governors association is. >> a lot of democratic senators are up for reelection. the pool of money will be pushed also for these governors races and more democratic than republican seat in the senate. >> there arare far more democrat of for reelection in 2014
for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the other guy. i understand this is a team sport, a competitive environment we are in, but at the end of the day, if we're not solving problems, it is pretty of the. >> -- empty. >> can you trace the trajectory of the partisanship? >> i can see it very directly going back to 1994. newt gingrich, he had a vie
from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors and judges is common. most critical, the fundamental question of judicial independence remains ever elusive. the most sensitive cases still remain within the party control. number 3, and finally, what will be the process for future collaboration for the united states and china? i hope this group can talk about it. we have such firepower in the united states with great universities, wonderful legal societies that are willing to share our society -- our lot -- our knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great hono
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
's not on that face. >> i've been on that bus. >> they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experiences, this phenomenon, that so many of us had experienced in one way or another, and had no words for. other than adolescence, other than growing up. we finally -- people were starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of growing up. this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. and director lee hirsch and i decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say this isn't something that we can accept anymore. a normal part of our culture. >> film maker cynthia loewen has followed up her award winning film by gathering essays and personal stories in "bully." hear more tonight at 10:00 on "after words" on c-span2 and more book tv online, and like us on facebook. next chiefs of staff to the governors of virginia, colorado, and oklahoma talk about the fiscal issues of their
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8